The Climate System Analysis Group at the University of Cape Town is a unique research group within Africa. We have an eclectic mix of specialties, but most importantly we put the needs of developing nation users at the forefront of everything we do. As a result, CSAG seeks to apply our core research to meet the knowledge needs of responding to climate variability and change.

CSAG

The Climate System Analysis Group at the University of Cape Town is a unique research group within Africa. We have an eclectic mix of specialties, but most importantly we put the needs of developing nation users at the forefront of everything we do. As a result, CSAG seeks to apply our core research to meet the knowledge needs of responding to climate variability and change.

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Honourable CSAGers, Good evening, sanibonani, molweni, dumelang, riperile, ndimadekwana, goeienaand. The year 2014 marked the publication of the Fifth Assessment report (AR5) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In keeping with the previous format, the report has been grouped into three working groups: Working Group I: the Physical Science Basis; Working Group II:… Read more »

Green police

  Back in the days I was known among my group of friends as the environmentalist, the green police. Without me even saying anything friends would apologise that they had not yet had their recycling set up properly, or that they chose to drive to the gym when they could have walked. In those days… Read more »

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  The prestigious CSAG Joe Blogs Award for 2014 was announced this morning to celebrate another successful year of intriguing, captivating and compelling blog posts. Having been established in 2013 by our colleague Joseph Daron its was an exciting morning for all at CSAG to hear who would hold the title for the second year… Read more »

Glencairn

Cape Town’s coastline is vulnerable to a number of pressures including sea level rise, coastal erosion and increasing urban development. In making decisions to protect the coastline and coastal infrastructure from these stressors, the views of multiple diverse stakeholders need to be consulted. However, incorporating and balancing different stakeholder perspectives is not straightforward. Joseph Daron… Read more »

group

CSAG is one of many partners working across Africa and India as part of the ASSAR (Adaptation at Scale in Semi-Arid Regions) project. Led by ACDI at UCT, the project aims to develop a base of knowledge that will guide and inform climate change adaptation in semi-arid areas in Africa and India. Modathir Zaroug has… Read more »

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Life has not been very fair to mermaids. And why would it be? Too many changes have occurred in such a short lapse of time. Since the melting of Greenland in the 36th century, the planet has reversed back to the most dreadful global cooling event. And our 2 new baby oceans Agassean and Green are… Read more »

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The 25 Green Talents 2014 have been selected based on their original ideas and excellent research in the field of sustainable development.   Out of more than 800 applications from over 100 countries, a high ranking jury of experts selected 25 up-and-coming scientists one of whom is UCT / CSAG’s PhD student Nkulumo Zinyengere for his… Read more »

forblog

The recent blogs on this site discussed the need for individual action around climate change – amongst other thoughts.  Today I was reading the news articles and browsing Facebook and it got me thinking about how the awareness around these issues get propagated and why some causes/ideas/events seem to move much faster than others.  Yes… Read more »

Bristol Climate Change March 2014

The email discussion recorded below ensued after a link was shared which spoke about “20 things YOU can do to address the climate crisis“.  Read that article first! This conversation is a valuable starting point to thinking about what you can do … have more conversations! [Edited to remove too many personal aspersions, and spell… Read more »